Hamfare

The crime of breaking into a house to rob. It is mentioned in the *DB entry for the city of Chester, in the section where its laws are itemised. For hamfare, the penalty was a fine of £4 if committed on a Sunday or feast day, while 40s was payable for other days. -

Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases. .

Look at other dictionaries:

  • hamfare — ˈhamˌfa(a)](ə)r, fe] noun Etymology: Middle English hamfare, from ham home + fare journey, expedition more at fare : hamesucken …   Useful english dictionary

  • hamfare — ham·fare …   English syllables

  • hamfare — /haemfer/ (Sax. From ham, a house.) In Saxon law, an assault made in a house; a breach of the peace in a private This word by some is said to signify the freedom of a man s See also hamsocne …   Black's law dictionary

  • hamfare — An assault upon a person committed within a house or dwelling …   Ballentine's law dictionary

  • Forsteal — An offence mentioned in *DB relating the laws of the city of Chester. It meant violent affray in the streets. The penalty was a fine of £4 if committed on a feast day or a Sunday; on other days the fine was 40s. Cf. Fihtwite, Forestel; Hamfare;… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Hamsocn — The offence of forcible entry into another s house, or following him inside and assaulting him there. This was one of the offences reserved to the king s judgement. It would seem there was little real difference between hamsocn and *hamfare. The… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Hengwite — Offence mentioned in a section of *DB dealing with the laws of the city of Chester. Hengwite was failure to raise the *hue and cry. An ordinary citizen was liable to a fine of 10s, while an *earl or king s *reeve had to pay a fine of 20s. Cf.… …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

  • Husbreche — An attack on a dwelling, which, like arson and murder, *LHP states could not be compensated for by a money payment, unlike e.g. *strastbreche. Cf. Botleas; Hamfare; Hamsocn …   Dictionary of Medieval Terms and Phrases

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